Pagina 34 di 35 primaprima ... 2432333435 ultimoultimo
Visualizzazione dei risultati da 826 a 850 su 864

Discussione: 737 MAX 8 Ethiopian si schianta subito dopo il decollo da Addis Abeba

  1. #826
    Member L'avatar di OneShot
    Registrato dal
    Dec 2015
    residenza
    Paris
    Messaggi
    1,358

    Predefinito Re: 737 MAX 8 Ethiopian si schianta subito dopo il decollo da Addis Abeba

    Bellissima cronistoria, condita con fatti e dichiarazioni, apparsa sul NYT.
    Assolutamente da leggere.

    . .Boeing’s 737 Max: 1960s Design, 1990s Computing Power and Paper Manuals

    Pilots start some new Boeing planes by turning a knob and flipping two switches.

    The Boeing 737 Max, the newest passenger jet on the market, works differently. Pilots follow roughly the same seven steps used on the first 737 nearly 52 years ago: Shut off the cabin’s air-conditioning, redirect the air flow, switch on the engine, start the flow of fuel, revert the air flow, turn back on the air conditioning, and turn on a generator.

    The 737 Max is a legacy of its past, built on decades-old systems, many that date back to the original version. The strategy, to keep updating the plane rather than starting from scratch, offered competitive advantages. Pilots were comfortable flying it, while airlines didn’t have to invest in costly new training for their pilots and mechanics. For Boeing, it was also faster and cheaper to redesign and recertify than starting anew.

    But the strategy has now left the company in crisis, following two deadly crashes in less than five months. The Max stretched the 737 design, creating a patchwork plane that left pilots without some safety features that could be important in a crisis — ones that have been offered for years on other planes. It is the only modern Boeing jet without an electronic alert system that explains what is malfunctioning and how to resolve it. Instead pilots have to check a manual.

    The Max also required makeshift solutions to keep the plane flying like its ancestors, workarounds that may have compromised safety. While the findings aren’t final, investigators suspect that one workaround, an anti-stall system designed to compensate for the larger engines, was central to the crash last month in Ethiopia and an earlier one in Indonesia.
    The Max “ain’t your father’s Buick,” said Dennis Tajer, a spokesman for the American Airlines pilots’ union who has flown the 737 for a decade. He added that “it’s not lost on us that the foundation of this aircraft is from the ’60s.”
    The Max, Boeing’s best-selling model, with more than 5,000 orders, is suddenly a reputational hazard. It could be weeks or months before regulators around the world lift their ban on the plane, after Boeing’s expected software fix was delayed. Southwest Airlines and American Airlines have canceled some flights through May because of the Max grounding.

    The company has slowed production of the plane, putting pressure on its profits, and some buyers are reconsidering their orders. Shares of the company fell over 4 percent on Monday, and are down 11 percent since the Ethiopia crash.
    “It was state of the art at the time, but that was 50 years ago,” said Rick Ludtke, a former Boeing engineer who helped design the Max’s cockpit. “It’s not a good airplane for the current environment.”

    The 737 has long been a reliable aircraft, flying for decades with relatively few issues. Gordon Johndroe, a Boeing spokesman, defended the development of the Max, saying that airlines wanted an updated 737 over a new single-aisle plane and that pilots were involved in its design.

    “Listening to pilots is an important aspect of our work. Their experienced input is front-and-center in our mind when we develop airplanes,” he said in a statement. “We share a common priority — safety — and we listen carefully to their feedback.” He added that American regulators approved the plane under the same standards they used with previous aircraft.
    Boeing’s chief executive, Dennis Muilenburg, said in a statement on Friday that the crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia appeared to have been caused by the Max’s new anti-stall system. “We have the responsibility to eliminate this risk, and we know how to do it,” he said.
    At a factory near Seattle on Jan. 17, 1967, flight attendants christened the first Boeing 737, smashing champagne bottles over its wing. Boeing pitched the plane as a smaller alternative to its larger jets, earning it the nickname the “Baby Boeing.”

    Early on, sales lagged Boeing’s biggest competitor, McDonnell Douglas. In 1972, Boeing had delivered just 14 of the jets, and it considered selling the program to a Japanese manufacturer, said Peter Morton, the 737 marketing manager in the early 1970s. “We had to decide if we were going to end it, or invest in it,” Mr. Morton said.

    Ultimately, Boeing invested. The 737 eventually began to sell, bolstered by airline deregulation in 1978. Six years later, Boeing updated the 737 with its “classic” series, followed by the “next generation” in 1997, and the Max in 2017. Now nearly one in every three domestic flights in the United States is on a 737, more than any other line of aircraft.
    Each of the three redesigns came with a new engine, updates to the cabin and other changes. But Boeing avoided overhauling the jet in order to appease airlines, according to current and former Boeing executives, pilots and engineers, some of whom spoke on the condition of anonymity because of the open investigations. Airlines wanted new 737s to match their predecessors so pilots could skip expensive training in flight simulators and easily transition to new jets.
    Boeing’s strategy worked. The Federal Aviation Administration never required simulator training for pilots switching from one 737 to the next.

    “Airlines don’t want Boeing to give them a fancy new product if it requires them to retrain their pilots,” said Matthew Menza, a former 737 Max test pilot for Boeing. “So you iterate off a design that’s 50 years old. The old adage is: If it’s not broke, don’t fix it.”
    It did require engineering ingenuity, to ensure a decades-old jet handled mostly the same. In doing so, some of the jet’s one-time selling points became challenges.

    For instance, in the early years of the 737, jet travel was rapidly expanding across the world. The plane’s low-slung frame was a benefit for airlines and airports in developing countries. Workers there could load bags by hand without a conveyor belt and maintain the engines without a lift, Mr. Morton said. In the decades that followed, the low frame repeatedly complicated efforts to fit bigger engines under the wing.

    By 2011, Boeing executives were starting to question whether the 737 design had run its course. The company wanted to create an entirely new single-aisle jet. Then Boeing’s rival Airbus added a new fuel-efficient engine to its line of single-aisle planes, the A320, and Boeing quickly decided to update the jet again.
    “We all rolled our eyes. The idea that, ‘Here we go. The 737 again,’” said Mr. Ludtke, the former 737 Max cockpit designer who spent 19 years at Boeing.

    “Nobody was quite perhaps willing to say it was unsafe, but we really felt like the limits were being bumped up against,” he added.

    Some engineers were frustrated they would have to again spend years updating the same jet, taking care to limit any changes, instead of starting fresh and incorporating significant technological advances, the current and former engineers and pilots said. The Max still has roughly the original layout of the cockpit and the hydraulic system of cables and pulleys to control the plane, which aren’t used in modern designs. The flight-control computers have roughly the processing power of 1990s home computers. A Boeing spokesman said the aircraft was designed with an appropriate level of technology to ensure safety.

    When engineers did make changes, it sometimes created knock-on effects for how the plane handled, forcing Boeing to get creative. The company added a new system that moves plates on the wing in part to reduce stress on the plane from its added weight. Boeing recreated the decades-old physical gauges on digital screens.

    As Boeing pushed its engineers to figure out how to accommodate bigger, more fuel-efficient engines, height was again an issue. Simply lengthening the landing gear to make the plane taller could have violated rules for exiting the plane in an emergency.
    Instead, engineers were able to add just a few inches to the front landing gear and shift the engines farther forward on the wing. The engines fit, but the Max sat at a slightly uneven angle when parked.

    While that design solved one problem, it created another. The larger size and new location of the engines gave the Max the tendency to tilt up during certain flight maneuvers, potentially to a dangerous angle.

    To compensate, Boeing engineers created the automated anti-stall system, called MCAS, that pushed the jet’s nose down if it was lifting too high. The software was intended to operate in the background so that the Max flew just like its predecessor. Boeing didn’t mention the system in its training materials for the Max.

    Boeing also designed the system to rely on a single sensor — a rarity in aviation, where redundancy is common. Several former Boeing engineers who were not directly involved in the system’s design said their colleagues most likely opted for such an approach since relying on two sensors could still create issues. If one of two sensors malfunctioned, the system could struggle to know which was right.

    Airbus addressed this potential problem on some of its planes by installing three or more such sensors. Former Max engineers, including one who worked on the sensors, said adding a third sensor to the Max was a nonstarter. Previous 737s, they said, had used two and managers wanted to limit changes.
    “They wanted to A, save money and B, to minimize the certification and flight-test costs,” said Mike Renzelmann, an engineer who worked on the Max’s flight controls. “Any changes are going to require recertification.” Mr. Renzelmann was not involved in discussions about the sensors.

    The Max also lacked more modern safety features.

    Most new Boeing jets have electronic systems that take pilots through their preflight checklists, ensuring they don’t skip a step and potentially miss a malfunctioning part. On the Max, pilots still complete those checklists manually in a book.

    A second electronic system found on other Boeing jets also alerts pilots to unusual or hazardous situations during flight and lays out recommended steps to resolve them.

    On 737s, a light typically indicates the problem and pilots have to flip through their paper manuals to find next steps. In the doomed Indonesia flight, as the Lion Air pilots struggled with MCAS for control, the pilots consulted the manual moments before the jet plummeted into the Java Sea, killing all 189 people aboard.

    “Meanwhile, I’m flying the jet,” said Mr. Tajer, the American Airlines 737 captain. “Versus, pop, it’s on your screen. It tells you, This is the problem and here’s the checklist that’s recommended.”

    Boeing decided against adding it to the Max because it could have prompted regulators to require new pilot training, according to two former Boeing employees involved in the decision.

    The Max also runs on a complex web of cables and pulleys that, when pilots pull back on the controls, transfer that movement to the tail. By comparison, Airbus jets and Boeing’s more modern aircraft, such as the 777 and 787, are “fly-by-wire,” meaning pilots’ movement of the flight controls is fed to a computer that directs the plane. The design allows for far more automation, including systems that prevent the jet from entering dangerous situations, such as flying too fast or too low. Some 737 pilots said they preferred the cable-and-pulley system to fly-by-wire because they believed it gave them more control.

    In the recent crashes, investigators believe the MCAS malfunctioned and moved a tail flap called the stabilizer, tilting the plane toward the ground. On the doomed Ethiopian Airlines flight, the pilots tried to combat the system by cutting power to the stabilizer’s motor, according to the preliminary crash report.

    Once the power was cut, the pilots tried to regain control manually by turning a wheel next to their seat. The 737 is the last modern Boeing jet that uses a manual wheel as its backup system. But Boeing has long known that turning the wheel is difficult at high speeds, and may have required two pilots to work together.

    In the final moments of the Ethiopian Airlines flight, the first officer said the method wasn’t working, according to the preliminary crash report. About 1 minute and 49 seconds later, the plane crashed, killing 157 people.
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/08/b...-737-max-.html

  2. #827

    Predefinito Re: 737 MAX 8 Ethiopian si schianta subito dopo il decollo da Addis Abeba

    Quote Originariamente inviato da OneShot Visualizza il messaggio
    Bellissima cronistoria, condita con fatti e dichiarazioni, apparsa sul NYT.
    Assolutamente da leggere.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/08/b...-737-max-.html
    He added that American regulators approved the plane under the same standards they used with previous aircraft.
    Grazie per il post.
    La frase, penso e spero di circostanza, potrebbe leggersi in due modi ben distinti, molto ben distinti.

    Da quanto emerge, anche in caso di assoluto non coinvolgimento del MCAS, Boeing ha esagerato a rilavorare così tanto lo stesso aereomobile. Produci un game changer come il 787, dimostri che quando VUOI puoi fare cose incredibile, e poi allunghi qui, sposti lì, lasci cavi e carrucole e volantini sperando nei muscoli), eviti di implementare nuove interfaccie per poter allettare con costi minori di transizione.

    Ritengo che debbano ricevere l'unico messaggio nell'unico posto che sembrano comprendere e di cui sembrano preoccuparti al momento. Pecuniario. Dovevano ricertificare se mettevano tre sonde ?
    E quindi ? Ricertificavano.
    Ho una sonda ? forse funziona, forse
    Ho due sonde ? sono certo che funzionano ma se una si guasta lo capisco ma sò solo che non posso essere certo del valore (lancio della monetina)
    Ho tre sonde ? sono certo che funzionano e se una si guasta ne vengo informato e posso decidere su quale dei dati fare più affidamento

  3. #828

    Predefinito Re: 737 MAX 8 Ethiopian si schianta subito dopo il decollo da Addis Abeba

    Dal report si evince che tutte le azioni che hanno portato alla morte di più di 300 persone sono in gran parte attribuibili al desiderio di Boeing di rinnovare il proprio 737 spendendo il meno possibile e facendo spendere il meno possibile alle compagnie aeree.

    Come scritto sopra, probabilmente sarebbe bastato che il sistema anti stallo leggesse i dati di volo da 3 sonde piuttosto che da una, per evitare le due tragedie. Peccato che ciò avrebbe comportato un aumento dei costi di sviluppo e dei tempi di commercializzazione.

    Se tale atteggiamento ha permesso a Boeing di raccogliere ben 5000 ordini probabilmente hanno fatto bene, peccato sarebbe stata solo questione di tempo per far sì che le magagne venissero fuori.

    Terribile.

    Inviato dal mio CLT-L09 utilizzando Tapatalk

  4. #829

    Predefinito Re: 737 MAX 8 Ethiopian si schianta subito dopo il decollo da Addis Abeba

    Quote Originariamente inviato da Nickee Visualizza il messaggio
    Dal report si evince che tutte le azioni che hanno portato alla morte di più di 300 persone sono in gran parte attribuibili al desiderio di Boeing di rinnovare il proprio 737 spendendo il meno possibile e facendo spendere il meno possibile alle compagnie aeree.
    Chi compra spendendo 120 non ha poi tutto questo interesse a sapere che 100 vanno al produttore e 20 in spese collaterali oppure tutti e 120 al produttore
    Chi produce ha invece MOLTO interesse a che gli arrivino tutti i 120 spesi (o la maggior parte).


    Quote Originariamente inviato da Nickee Visualizza il messaggio
    Se tale atteggiamento ha permesso a Boeing di raccogliere ben 5000 ordini probabilmente hanno fatto bene
    No, ha fatto bene solo ai bilanci e causato oltre 300 morti (non intenzionalmente ma con il classico approccio rischi/benefici).
    Installavano, cambiavano, ricertificavano ed evitavano almeno 300 morti; al posto dei 5000 ordini magari ne avrebbero avuti solo 4000, e quindi ?
    Se domani l'impatto finanziario di questa faccenda alla fine sarà a loro vantaggio, che lezione avranno imparato ? Che la vendita di 1000 aerei in più vale un paio di incidenti catastrofici e la vita di oltre 300 persone ?

    Ripeto, Being quando VUOLE si è dimostrata in grado di creare game changers, come il 787. Qui non ha semplicemente voluto.

  5. #830

    Predefinito Re: 737 MAX 8 Ethiopian si schianta subito dopo il decollo da Addis Abeba

    Quote Originariamente inviato da Volvic Visualizza il messaggio
    Chi compra spendendo 120 non ha poi tutto questo interesse a sapere che 100 vanno al produttore e 20 in spese collaterali oppure tutti e 120 al produttore
    Chi produce ha invece MOLTO interesse a che gli arrivino tutti i 120 spesi (o la maggior parte).



    No, ha fatto bene solo ai bilanci e causato oltre 300 morti (non intenzionalmente ma con il classico approccio rischi/benefici).
    Installavano, cambiavano, ricertificavano ed evitavano almeno 300 morti; al posto dei 5000 ordini magari ne avrebbero avuti solo 4000, e quindi ?
    Se domani l'impatto finanziario di questa faccenda alla fine sarà a loro vantaggio, che lezione avranno imparato ? Che la vendita di 1000 aerei in più vale un paio di incidenti catastrofici e la vita di oltre 300 persone ?

    Ripeto, Being quando VUOLE si è dimostrata in grado di creare game changers, come il 787. Qui non ha semplicemente voluto.
    Ovviamente il messaggio non era un plauso a boeing ma piuttosto un ulteriore accusa (per quanto possa valere la mia opinione)

    Inviato dal mio CLT-L09 utilizzando Tapatalk

  6. #831

    Predefinito Re: 737 MAX 8 Ethiopian si schianta subito dopo il decollo da Addis Abeba

    Quote Originariamente inviato da OneShot Visualizza il messaggio
    Bellissima cronistoria, condita con fatti e dichiarazioni, apparsa sul NYT.
    Assolutamente da leggere.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/08/b...-737-max-.html
    Ringrazio OneShot per il link, molto interessante.
    Cominciano ad essermi chiari diversi aspetti e dinamiche di questa vicenda, e personalmente mi mettono addosso molta tristezza.
    Boeing ne esce malissimo
    FCO-PSA-FLO-GOA-BLQ-MXP-BGY-REG-CTA-MIR-TNR-NOS-TLE-AUH-DXB-DOH-CMB-BKK-NRT-KBP-BBU-BUD-PRG-BTS-ZRH-MUC-TXL-SXF-LBC-RIX-TLL-VNO-KRK-AMS-CDG-STN-LGW-LHR-LCY-MAD-LIS-OPO-ATH-RHO-PAS-HAV-SCU-LIM-CUZ-AQP-NZA-LPB-NAT-SSA-IOS-GIG

  7. #832

    Predefinito Re: 737 MAX 8 Ethiopian si schianta subito dopo il decollo da Addis Abeba

    Sembra sempre più assodato che il software abbia funzionato esattamente per il motivo per cui è stato creato. A questo punto mi chiedo se le modifiche che Boeing sta apportando siano necessarie e non sia più opportuno lavorare sulle sonde e la loro ridondanza.

  8. #833

    Predefinito Re: 737 MAX 8 Ethiopian si schianta subito dopo il decollo da Addis Abeba

    Quote Originariamente inviato da magick Visualizza il messaggio
    Sembra sempre più assodato che il software abbia funzionato esattamente per il motivo per cui è stato creato. A questo punto mi chiedo se le modifiche che Boeing sta apportando siano necessarie e non sia più opportuno lavorare sulle sonde e la loro ridondanza.
    Immagino che valutino anche l'intervento sulle sonde e ridondanza, il punto è che se riescono a modificare il software è molto più semplice per loro.

    Leggevo che Trump ha ventilato pesanti sanzioni per Airbus.

  9. #834

    Predefinito Re: 737 MAX 8 Ethiopian si schianta subito dopo il decollo da Addis Abeba

    Quote Originariamente inviato da Farfallina Visualizza il messaggio
    Leggevo che Trump ha ventilato pesanti sanzioni per Airbus.
    Sono cose leggermente diverse. Gli USA stanno ventilando sanzioni ai danni dell'UE per via di una sentenza del WTO che ha deciso che, per 380 e 350, Airbus ha ricevuto sussidi da parte dei paesi UE. Mi piacerebbe però sapere cosa pensa lo stesso WTO degli aiuti governativi americani, nonché di quelli di Washington e South Carolina, a favore di Boeing. Inoltre le Japanese Heavies hanno anch'esse ricevuto sussidi per il loro "pezzo" del programma 787... #ilpiupulitochalarogna
    Are we there yet? Stories from the road.

  10. #835
    Member L'avatar di OneShot
    Registrato dal
    Dec 2015
    residenza
    Paris
    Messaggi
    1,358

    Predefinito Re: 737 MAX 8 Ethiopian si schianta subito dopo il decollo da Addis Abeba

    Quote Originariamente inviato da magick Visualizza il messaggio
    Sembra sempre più assodato che il software abbia funzionato esattamente per il motivo per cui è stato creato. A questo punto mi chiedo se le modifiche che Boeing sta apportando siano necessarie e non sia più opportuno lavorare sulle sonde e la loro ridondanza.
    Le modifiche proposte sono già un ottimo compromesso per riportare il MAX in volo il più in fretta possibile: doppia sonda come "source" per il mcas con indicazione al flight crew di discordanza, rendere i due optional su AOA e disagree alert di serie, quindi ne verrebbe fuori una giusta pezza.
    Per le tre sonde, invece, servirebbero delle modifiche molto più laboriose, modificando più di un software, hardware e sistemi vari. Se viene reso chiaro ai piloti il problema legato a pitch, aoa e tutto quello che verrà fuori dai due incidenti, il 737 avrà lunga vita.
    Ricordatevi che no è stato l'unico aeroplano con problemi di manovrabilità: l'MD11 soffriva molto il crosswind e richiedeva precisione chirurgica in determinati avvicinamenti. Eppure era (è) una macchina fantastica.
    Il Trident della BEA che si schiantò dopo il decollo per un azionamento della leva della droop (così erano stati battezzati i leading edge slats) al posto dei flaps, ecc ecc...

  11. #836

    Predefinito Re: 737 MAX 8 Ethiopian si schianta subito dopo il decollo da Addis Abeba

    Quote Originariamente inviato da OneShot Visualizza il messaggio
    Le modifiche proposte sono già un ottimo compromesso per riportare il MAX in volo il più in fretta possibile: doppia sonda come "source" per il mcas con indicazione al flight crew di discordanza, rendere i due optional su AOA e disagree alert di serie, quindi ne verrebbe fuori una giusta pezza.
    Per le tre sonde, invece, servirebbero delle modifiche molto più laboriose, modificando più di un software, hardware e sistemi vari. Se viene reso chiaro ai piloti il problema legato a pitch, aoa e tutto quello che verrà fuori dai due incidenti, il 737 avrà lunga vita.
    Ricordatevi che no è stato l'unico aeroplano con problemi di manovrabilità: l'MD11 soffriva molto il crosswind e richiedeva precisione chirurgica in determinati avvicinamenti. Eppure era (è) una macchina fantastica.
    Il Trident della BEA che si schiantò dopo il decollo per un azionamento della leva della droop (così erano stati battezzati i leading edge slats) al posto dei flaps, ecc ecc...
    Grazie per la risposta esaustiva. In realtà avevo capito che uno degli optional riguardassero la possibilità di avere la terza sonda, da qui il mio commento.

  12. #837
    Senior Member L'avatar di East End Ave
    Registrato dal
    Aug 2013
    residenza
    su e giu' sull'atlantico...
    Messaggi
    3,515

    Predefinito Re: 737 MAX 8 Ethiopian si schianta subito dopo il decollo da Addis Abeba

    Quote Originariamente inviato da OneShot Visualizza il messaggio
    Le modifiche proposte sono già un ottimo compromesso per riportare il MAX in volo il più in fretta possibile: doppia sonda come "source" per il mcas con indicazione al flight crew di discordanza, rendere i due optional su AOA e disagree alert di serie, quindi ne verrebbe fuori una giusta pezza.
    Per le tre sonde, invece, servirebbero delle modifiche molto più laboriose, modificando più di un software, hardware e sistemi vari. Se viene reso chiaro ai piloti il problema legato a pitch, aoa e tutto quello che verrà fuori dai due incidenti, il 737 avrà lunga vita.
    Ricordatevi che no è stato l'unico aeroplano con problemi di manovrabilità: l'MD11 soffriva molto il crosswind e richiedeva precisione chirurgica in determinati avvicinamenti. Eppure era (è) una macchina fantastica.
    Il Trident della BEA che si schiantò dopo il decollo per un azionamento della leva della droop (così erano stati battezzati i leading edge slats) al posto dei flaps, ecc ecc...
    GRAZIE OneShot! La tua presenza sul forum, al pari di quella di altri professionisti di calibro, penso a MDSuper80-Tienneti-LICA...., permette il coinvolgimento di noi "umani" in tematiche altrimenti incomprensibili, permettendo comprensione e confronto; il pane di un forum di eccellenza.

  13. #838
    Junior Member
    Registrato dal
    Aug 2014
    residenza
    Torino
    Messaggi
    383

    Predefinito Re: 737 MAX 8 Ethiopian si schianta subito dopo il decollo da Addis Abeba

    Changes to Flight Software on 737 Max Escaped F.A.A. Scrutiny
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/11/b...vBg9mqJk1KHpKE
    By Jack Nicas, David Gelles and James Glanz

    While it was designing its newest jet, Boeing decided to quadruple the power of an automated system that could push down the plane’s nose — a movement that made it difficult for the pilots on two doomed flights to regain control.

    The company also expanded the use of the software to activate in more situations, as it did erroneously in the two deadly crashes involving the plane, the 737 Max, in recent months.

    None of those changes to the anti-stall system, known as MCAS, were fully examined by the Federal Aviation Administration.

    Although officials were aware of the changes, the modifications didn’t require a new safety review, according to three people with knowledge of the process. It wasn’t necessary under F.A.A. rules since the changes didn’t affect what the agency considers an especially critical or risky phase of flight.

    A new review would have required F.A.A. officials to take a closer look at the system’s effect on the overall safety of the plane, as well as to consider the potential consequences of a malfunction. Instead, the agency relied on an earlier assessment of the system, which was less powerful and activated in more limited circumstances.

    Ever since the crashes — in Indonesia last October and Ethiopia last month — investigators, prosecutors and lawmakers have scrutinized what went wrong, from the design and certification to the training and response.

    In both crashes, the authorities suspect that faulty sensor data triggered the anti-stall system, revealing a single point of failure on the plane. Pilots weren’t informed about the system until after the Lion Air crash in Indonesia, and even then, Boeing didn’t fully explain or understand the risks. The F.A.A. outsourced much of the certification to Boeing employees, creating a cozy relationship between the company and its regulator.

    But the omission by the F.A.A. exposes an embedded weakness in the approval process, providing new information about the failings that most likely contributed to the crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia.

    The F.A.A. is supposed to be the gold standard in global aviation regulation, with the toughest and most stringent rules for certifying planes. But the miscalculation over MCAS undermines the government’s oversight, raising further concerns about its ability to push back against the industry or root out design flaws.

    While it is unclear which officials were involved in the review of the anti-stall system, they followed a set of bureaucratic procedures, rather than taking a proactive approach. The result is that officials didn’t fully understand the risks of the more robust anti-stall system, which could cause a crash in less than a minute.

    “The more we know, the more we realize what we don’t know,” said John Cox, an aviation safety consultant and former 737 pilot.

    The F.A.A. defended its certification process, saying it has consistently produced safe aircraft. An F.A.A. spokesman said agency employees collectively spent more than 110,000 hours reviewing the Max, including 297 test flights.

    The spokesman said F.A.A. employees were following agency rules when they didn’t review the change. “The change to MCAS didn’t trigger an additional safety assessment because it did not affect the most critical phase of flight, considered to be higher cruise speeds,” an agency spokesman said. “At lower speeds, greater control movements are often necessary.”

    A spokesman for Boeing said, “The F.A.A. considered the final configuration and operating parameters of MCAS during Max certification, and concluded that it met all certification and regulatory requirements.”

    Some of the details of the evolving design of MCAS were earlier reported by The Seattle Times.

    MCAS was created to help make the 737 Max handle like its predecessors, part of Boeing’s strategy to get the plane done more quickly and cheaply.

    The system was initially designed to engage only in rare circumstances, namely high-speed maneuvers, in order to make the plane handle more smoothly and predictably for pilots used to flying older 737s, according to two former Boeing employees who spoke on the condition of anonymity because of the open investigations.

    For those situations, MCAS was limited to moving the stabilizer — the part of the plane that changes the vertical direction of the jet — about 0.6 degrees in about 10 seconds.

    It was around that design stage that the F.A.A. reviewed the initial MCAS design. The planes hadn’t yet gone through their first test flights.

    After the test flights began in early 2016, Boeing pilots found that just before a stall at various speeds, the Max handled less predictably than they wanted. So they suggested using MCAS for those scenarios, too, according to one former employee with direct knowledge of the conversations.

    But the system needed more power to work in a broader range of situations.

    At higher speeds, flight controls are more sensitive and less movement is needed to steer the plane. Consider the effect of turning a car’s steering wheel at 70 miles an hour versus 30 miles an hour.

    To prevent stalls at lower speeds, Boeing engineers decided that MCAS needed to move the stabilizer faster and by a larger amount. So Boeing engineers quadrupled the amount it could move the stabilizer in one cycle, to 2.5 degrees in less than 10 seconds.

    “That’s a huge difference,” said Dennis Tajer, a spokesman for the American Airlines pilots’ union who has flown 737s for a decade. “That’s the difference between controlled flight or not.”

    Speed was a defining characteristic for the F.A.A. The agency’s rules require an additional review only if the changes affect how the plane operates in riskier phases of flight: at high speeds and altitudes. Because the changes to the anti-stall system affected how it operated at lower speeds and altitudes, F.A.A. employees didn’t need to take a closer look at them.

    The overall system represented a major departure from Boeing’s design philosophy. Boeing has traditionally favored giving pilots control over their planes, rather than automated flight systems.

    “In creating MCAS, they violated a longstanding principle at Boeing to always have pilots ultimately in control of the aircraft,” said Chesley B. Sullenberger III, the retired pilot who landed a jet in the Hudson River. “In mitigating one risk, they created another, greater risk.”

    The missed risks, by the F.A.A. and Boeing, flowed to other decisions. A deep explanation of the system wasn’t included in the plane manual. The F.A.A. didn’t require training on it. Even Boeing test pilots weren’t fully briefed on MCAS.

    “Therein lies the issue with the design change: Those pitch rates were never articulated to us,” said one test pilot, Matthew Menza.

    Mr. Menza said he looked at documentation he still had and did not see mention of the rate of movement on MCAS. “So they certainly didn’t mention anything about pitch rates to us,” he said, “and I certainly would’ve loved to have known.”

    The system’s increased power was also compounded by its design: The software engaged repeatedly if the sensor suggested it was necessary to avoid a stall. In the Lion Air crash, data showed that the pilots, who weren’t aware of MCAS, fought for control of the plane, as it pushed the nose back down each time they pulled it up.

    Few truly understood just how powerful the system would prove. It wasn’t fully disclosed until after the Lion Air disaster, killing all 189 people on board. On the Ethiopian Airlines flight, the pilots struggled to regain control after MCAS engaged at least three times.

    Last month, during flight simulations recreating the problems with the Lion Air flight, American pilots were surprised at how strong MCAS was. They essentially had less than 40 seconds to manually override a system malfunction before a crash.

    Updates to the software by Boeing, which the F.A.A. will have to approve, will address some of the concerns with the anti-stall system. The changes will limit the system to engaging just once in most cases. And they will prevent MCAS from pushing the plane’s nose down more than a pilot could counteract by pulling up on the controls.

    Boeing had hoped to deliver the software fix to the F.A.A. by now but it was delayed by several weeks. As a result, the grounding of the jet is expected to drag on. Southwest Airlines and American Airlines have already canceled some flights through May.
    Carlo/Charlie/Charles/Fewwy/Ehi tu!
    GA Pilot + Passenger + Enthusiast
    TRN-FCO w/AZ finché se po'...

  14. #839

    Predefinito Re: 737 MAX 8 Ethiopian si schianta subito dopo il decollo da Addis Abeba

    Quote Originariamente inviato da Fewwy Visualizza il messaggio
    Changes to Flight Software on 737 Max Escaped F.A.A. Scrutiny
    [...] Although officials were aware of the changes, the modifications didn’t require a new safety review, according to three people with knowledge of the process. It wasn’t necessary under F.A.A. rules since the changes didn’t affect what the agency considers an especially critical or risky phase of flight.[...]
    Mi sembra che siamo di fronte a regole chiare e di buon senso, ma che vengono aggirate . Se per degli ispettori terzi, l'introduzione di un sistema in grado di influire così pesantemente nella dinamica del volo non è una modifica critica, vien da chiedersi cosa lo sia. E soprattutto, viene da chiedersi chi siano questi tre personaggi "con conoscenza del processo" e quanto effettivamente siano terzi rispetto agli interessi di chi quell'aereo lo produce.

  15. #840

    Predefinito Re: 737 MAX 8 Ethiopian si schianta subito dopo il decollo da Addis Abeba

    American Airlines ha esteso le cancellazioni dei voli fino ad agosto, questo vuol dire che non prevedono che Boeing riesce a risolvere i problemi prima?
    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-47928356

  16. #841

    Predefinito Re: 737 MAX 8 Ethiopian si schianta subito dopo il decollo da Addis Abeba

    Quote Originariamente inviato da magick Visualizza il messaggio
    American Airlines ha esteso le cancellazioni dei voli fino ad agosto, questo vuol dire che non prevedono che Boeing riesce a risolvere i problemi prima?
    Direi che significa soprattutto che le compagnie hanno bisogno di pianificare le loro operazioni, quindi devono comunque prendere delle decisioni certe anche nell'incertezza dei tempi altrui.

  17. #842
    Member
    Registrato dal
    Jun 2007
    residenza
    Albania
    Messaggi
    1,097

    Predefinito Re: 737 MAX 8 Ethiopian si schianta subito dopo il decollo da Addis Abeba

    President Trump on Twitter:
    Quote Originariamente inviato da Donald J. Trump Visualizza il messaggio
    What do I know about branding, maybe nothing (but I did become President!), but if I were Boeing, I would FIX the Boeing 737 MAX, add some additional great features, & REBRAND the plane with a new name.
    No product has suffered like this one. But again, what the hell do I know?

  18. #843

    Predefinito Re: 737 MAX 8 Ethiopian si schianta subito dopo il decollo da Addis Abeba

    "un bel tacer non fu mai twittato"

  19. #844
    Moderatore L'avatar di londonfog
    Registrato dal
    Jul 2012
    residenza
    Londra
    Messaggi
    7,777

    Predefinito Re: 737 MAX 8 Ethiopian si schianta subito dopo il decollo da Addis Abeba

    Quote Originariamente inviato da Brendon Visualizza il messaggio
    "un bel tacer non fu mai twittato"
    +1 and

  20. #845
    Amministratore L'avatar di enrico
    Registrato dal
    Jan 2008
    residenza
    Rapallo, Liguria.
    Messaggi
    14,476

    Predefinito Re: 737 MAX 8 Ethiopian si schianta subito dopo il decollo da Addis Abeba

    In questo momento è invece esperto su come spegnere incendi su cattedrali del XII secolo.

  21. #846

    Predefinito Re: 737 MAX 8 Ethiopian si schianta subito dopo il decollo da Addis Abeba

    Quote Originariamente inviato da rubinlami Visualizza il messaggio
    President Trump on Twitter:
    Che spreco di ossigeno di uomo.
    Are we there yet? Stories from the road.

  22. #847
    Member L'avatar di OneShot
    Registrato dal
    Dec 2015
    residenza
    Paris
    Messaggi
    1,358

    Predefinito Re: 737 MAX 8 Ethiopian si schianta subito dopo il decollo da Addis Abeba

    Non riesco a postare il video direttamente, ma dal link sotto potete farvi un'idea della reazione e lo sforzo di un equipaggio allo "stab trim runaway".

    https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update...58750970372097

  23. #848

    Predefinito Re: 737 MAX 8 Ethiopian si schianta subito dopo il decollo da Addis Abeba

    Quote Originariamente inviato da OneShot Visualizza il messaggio
    Non riesco a postare il video direttamente, ma dal link sotto potete farvi un'idea della reazione e lo sforzo di un equipaggio allo "stab trim runaway".

    https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update...58750970372097
    Grazie, molto interessante.
    Non sarebbe possibile variare il rapporto del comando del trim in modo da raddoppiare le "girate", ma dimezzando lo sforzo?
    Ciao

  24. #849
    Member L'avatar di OneShot
    Registrato dal
    Dec 2015
    residenza
    Paris
    Messaggi
    1,358

    Predefinito Re: 737 MAX 8 Ethiopian si schianta subito dopo il decollo da Addis Abeba

    Quote Originariamente inviato da belumosi Visualizza il messaggio
    Grazie, molto interessante.
    Non sarebbe possibile variare il rapporto del comando del trim in modo da raddoppiare le "girate", ma dimezzando lo sforzo?
    Credo che il backup manuale sia fatto di cavi e pulegge: servirebbe un servo comando elettrico che si attivi in caso di utilizzo manuale.
    Airbus ti fa usare il manual trim com molta leggerezza avvalendosi di una delle idrauliche (quale che essa sia ancora "available) per agire sul trim. Motivo per cui la rotellona del trim posta in cockpit si muove di pochi pollici per lato (nose up or nose down) e non ha quel movimento tipo affettatrice del 737.

  25. #850
    Senior Member L'avatar di East End Ave
    Registrato dal
    Aug 2013
    residenza
    su e giu' sull'atlantico...
    Messaggi
    3,515

    Predefinito Re: 737 MAX 8 Ethiopian si schianta subito dopo il decollo da Addis Abeba

    Quote Originariamente inviato da OneShot Visualizza il messaggio
    Non riesco a postare il video direttamente, ma dal link sotto potete farvi un'idea della reazione e lo sforzo di un equipaggio allo "stab trim runaway".

    https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update...58750970372097
    incredibile....sono sbalordito; in un mondo di elettronica totale si lascia un ultimo, disperato elemento salvavita, meccanico, ed e' praticamente inutilizzabile.

Pagina 34 di 35 primaprima ... 2432333435 ultimoultimo

Informazione discussione

Utenti che visualizzano questa discussione

Ci sono attualmente 8 utenti che visualizzano di questa discussione. (0 utenti 8 ospiti)

Discussioni simili

  1. DXB, Incidente a 777 in atterraggio (volo EK521)
    Da Cekky nel forum Aviazione Civile
    Risposte: 181
    Ultimo messaggio: 18th April 2017, 14: 30
  2. Volo di consegna "umanitario" per l'ultimo 787 Ethiopian
    Da james84 nel forum Aviazione Civile
    Risposte: 0
    Ultimo messaggio: 1st November 2012, 15: 29
  3. Risposte: 0
    Ultimo messaggio: 29th March 2011, 11: 39
  4. Risposte: 11
    Ultimo messaggio: 12th January 2009, 00: 31
  5. Incidente aereo (con Babbo Natale) in volo.
    Da Doctor K nel forum Spot IT - L'angolo dello spotter
    Risposte: 7
    Ultimo messaggio: 11th March 2008, 17: 11

Segnalibri

Segnalibri

Permessi di invio

Permessi di invio

  • Non puoi inserire discussioni
  • Non puoi inserire repliche
  • Non puoi inserire allegati
  • Non puoi modificare i tuoi messaggi
  •  
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO